Property Litigation Solicitors

Property Litigation

Property disputes are common both in the residential and commercial context. You may be a long-term tenant who owns a flat or a house as leasehold, and has difficulties getting the landlord to undertake repairs, or a commercial tenant facing excessive service charges.

We recognise that property related dispute require specialist advise and our team have a broad range of experience in all aspect of property litigation, both pursuing and defencing claims.

Our lawyers will provide you with pragmatic advice about your dispute to ensure that it is resolved as quickly as possible, in a proportionate way. Our advice will set out all options available to you including litigation, alternative dispute resolution and where applicable arbitration.

In respect of commercial property, we can help with:

  • Commercial Landlord & Tenant
  • Contentious and Non-Contentious Business Lease Renewals
  • Dilapidations Claims
  • Easements and Restrictive Covenants
  • Rent and Service Charge Recovery including Commercial Rent Arrears Recovery as well as court proceedings.
  • Breach of covenant and forfeiture claims including applications for relief from forfeiture.
  • Exercising break options.
  • Obtaining possession of land or premises occupied unlawfully

In respect of residential property, we can help with:

  • Possession Claims
  • Leasehold Enfranchisement and Lease Extensions acting for either landlord or tenant
  • Right to Manage claims
  • Rent and Service Charge including court, tribunal and insolvency proceedings as wel as forfeiture and relief for forfeiture claims
  • Service Charge disputes including section 20 major works consultations
  • Neighbour Disputes including trespass, adverse possession, rights of way, boundaries and nuisance.
  • Co-ownership Disputes

FAQ’s

It depends on what the court says you have done, your previous record if you have one, and whether or not you admitted the offence. In most serious cases the court will ask the probation service to deliver a report before passing sentence, which helps the court to decide upon the punishment.

  • Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    I’ve been browsing online more than three hours as of late, yet I never found any attention-grabbing article like yours. It is pretty price enough for me. Personally, if all site owners and bloggers made excellent content material as you did, the net might be much more helpful than ever before.

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    If you plead not guilty the court will fix the case for a trial either in the magistrates’ court or the crown court depending upon the seriousness of the matter alleged. Sometimes you will be given a choice as to where your case is heard. At the trial witnesses will be called and you will be invited to give evidence before the court decides on a verdict.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    In a legal aid case, probably not. We always instruct experienced and reputable barristers, whatever type of case it is, but in legal aid cases we can’t guarantee availability. If you instruct us privately we will arrange a conference with your barrister well before the case comes to court, and we can usually guarantee that the same advocate will appear for you in court. In serious cases you may wish to secure the services of senior counsel, perhaps with a specialist practice in the area of law concerned, and in these cases we will try to negotiate competitive fees to make sure you have the best possible defence.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    It depends. Legal aid is available in some cases, depending on the seriousness of the case, and your financial circumstances. In other cases you may need to pay for a solicitor to represent you. We usually offer fixed fees in these circumstances, so that you know how much you are likely to have to pay from the beginning.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Sometimes suspects are invited to attend voluntarily to be questioned by police or other investigators. Of course, you have a right to refuse, but this means that you might not get a chance to put forward your side of the story. And in some circumstances where a suspect declines to attend voluntarily the police may decide to arrest him or her instead.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Yes. The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 guarantees this right to you. This means that you can speak to a solicitor or qualified legal advisor on the phone or face to face to get advice before you have to answer any questions, and you can even have your representative with you in the police interview. You are permitted to speak to them privately at any time, and questioning has to stop for this to take place if you ask for it.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Commercial-Dispute ResolutionContentious ProbateCorporate InsolvencyDirector DutiesDirectors disqualification
    No available information
    Eleanor is an experienced commercial litigator with over twenty years’ experience. She is a speci...
    Commercial-Dispute ResolutionCorporate InsolvencyDebtDirectors disqualification
    No available information
    Victoria is a Commercial Litigation solicitor within the dispute resolution team. She joined Wannop...
    Commercial-Dispute ResolutionLandlords-Tenant
    No available information
    Martin qualified as a Chartered Legal Executive in 1998 ( with 13 years prior legal experience) . He...
    Commercial-Dispute ResolutionContentious ProbateCorporate InsolvencyDirector DutiesDirectors disqualification
    No available information
    Eleanor is an experienced commercial litigator with over twenty years’ experience. She is a speci...